We have inaugurated the initial phase of our flare gas utilization program in West Texas, where we convert otherwise wasted flare gas into a valuable energy source. This initiative minimizes waste, optimizes energy usage, and contributes to a more sustainable future for our community.

What is flare gas?

Flare gas is the natural gas burned off during oil and gas extraction. This gas is flared, or burned, to reduce the release of raw methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Flaring is done for safety reasons and to manage gas that cannot be processed or sold. However, it represents wasted energy and contributes to carbon emission as the process emits a range of pollutants including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), contributing significantly to air pollution and climate change. Currently, over 148 billion cubic meters of natural gas is being flared or vented according to the World Bank, which accounts for more than 500 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent emissions.

Flare gas prior to the installation of our flare gas utilization system

Flare gas utilization program

We are leading the charge in repurposing otherwise wasted flare gas into a valuable energy source. Our project generates 1 MW of power, salvaging gas that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. Through the installation of power generation infrastructure, we efficiently convert this gas into electricity, fueling two advanced data centers.

This environmentally responsible initiative not only minimizes waste but also optimizes energy usage, contributing to a more sustainable future for our community.

Installation of our flare gas utilization system in West Texas

We installed our first Flare Gas Utilization System at the Sloan Petroleum Inc. oil extraction site in West Texas. Natural gas is being produced daily during oil extraction as a byproduct. We took over the site under the following conditions:

We took over the site under these conditions

We took over the site under these conditions

During the assessment, we aligned our gas usage and pressure balancing with the oil production company. For operating our gas engine, we receive the gas at a fixed pressure. If oil production increases, excess gas is vented to the flare via a valve and burned off. This is required solely for safety purposes; essentially, once our system is operational, there will be no need to burn flare gas.

Landscaping

As part of the landscaping efforts, we elevated the ground level of the installed data centers to ensure they remain operational and safe during potential flooding events.

Security

Spotlights with dusk sensors were mounted on the data center rooftops, and a security camera system with outdoor alarms was installed. The area is secured with a fence topped with barbed wire for additional protection.

The data centers are fitted with cooling fans to ensure their functionality even in high temperatures. A third container was also installed for storage purposes.

The area is secured with a fence topped with barbed wire

1.2 MW gas engine

A 1.2 MW Waukesha gas engine was installed on the previously set steel piers for electricity generation.

A 1.2 MW Waukesha gas engine was installed

The gas is supplied through a flare line connection, with consumption measured by a gas meter for accounting with the oil company.

The flare gas is routed to the gas engine via an underground pipeline, and a dedicated conduit was constructed for the electrical cables.

No more wasted energy, flare gas is eliminated

We eliminated flare gas

We not only eliminated flare gas but also utilized the previously wasted energy to support a more sustainable future. Moreover, we have developed a high-performance data center that caters to the growing computational needs of Bitcoin, AI development, scientific research, and simulation calculations.

We have developed a high-performance data center

Environmental impact

The environmental benefits of utilizing flare gas for power generation are profound. First and foremost, it reduces the emission of harmful gas into the atmosphere. Capturing methane, a potent greenhouse gas, and converting it into CO2 (a less impactful greenhouse gas when released into the atmosphere) during combustion, significantly mitigates the effect of these emissions. Additionally, this practice reduces the carbon intensity of oil and gas operations and contributes to global efforts to combat climate change.

Still not using flare gas?

After successfully implementing our first flare gas utilization project, we are now prepared to reduce more flare gas and convert it into energy. If you have any questions about the project or if you have flare gas to utilize, let’s talk about it. Do not hesitate to contact us.